Course: The Neuroscience of Pain with Stephani Sutherland, PhD

Course Outline

Module 1 The Neuroscience of Pain
Unit 1 Course Handout: The Neuroscience of Pain
Module 2 Video Lectures: The Neuroscience of Pain
Unit 1 Video: The Neuroscience of Pain
Unit 2 Short Topics: The Neuroscience of Pain
Module 3 Additional Resources from Dr. Sutherland
Unit 1 Additional Resources from Dr. Sutherland

Course Description

Is pain the inevitable destination of the aging process? If pain starts in the brain, can it be re-wired? Why do some people experience more pain than others? Learn the answers to these questions and more as Stephani shares her expertise on neuroscience, pain and Yoga.

Yoga and modern neuroscience are two systems with a common goal: to understand the human mind. Remarkably, Yoga and neuroscience offer similar, often complementary findings about the workings of the mind and the nervous system. Learn the answers to these questions and more as Stephani shares her expertise on neuroscience, pain and Yoga. Stephani’s work has been published in magazines such as Scientific American, Spirituality and Health and many more.

Course Materials

Includes downloadable PDF Hand-out and 1.75 hours of video instruction.

Testimonials

“Very good. She knows her subject and able to get it across in understandable manner. It was very interesting. Example and illustrations were very good.”

“So interesting, and hopeful, and more than I anticipated. Stephani explained this very complex science in a say that I was able to grasp – and become increasingly awed by the intelligence our bodies and mind and everything within working together. She tied this information beautifully to yoga asanas and living. She made me hungry to learn more. Thank you Stephani!”

“This topic blew me away. Many things to think about and consider. the topic was right on with the Yogic philosophy of putting distance between ‘you’ and your ills.”

Bio: Stephani Sutherland, PhD and Neuroscientist, Yoga Teacher
Stephani earned her PhD in Neuroscience in 2001 as a researcher studying ion channels in pain-sensing nerves. Since then, Stephani has worked as a freelance science writer for outlets including the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American Mind and Pain Research Forum, among others. Stephani taught neuroscience, science writing, biology, and nutrition at Washington State University Vancouver, where she also served as an academic advisor to health-professions students. www.stephanisutherland.com